Consumer Information

INSTITUTIONAL AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS

INSTITUTIONAL INFORMATION

GED Disclosure

Selective Service

Males between the ages of 18 through 25 are required to register with the Selective Service System to receive financial aid. Selective Service "mail-back" registration forms are available at any Post Office. A man can fill it out, sign it, affix postage, and mail it to Selective Service. Another way is to check a box on the application form for Federal Student Financial Aid (FAFSA form). He can check "Yes" on Box #29 of that form, and the Department of Education will furnish Selective Service with the information to register him. Students may also register online by going to the Selective Service website at www.sss.gov

Students with Disability

Homestead Schools does not discriminate in admission or access to our program on the basis of age, race, color, sex, disability, religion, sexual orientation or national origin. The school is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for eligible students with documented disabilities as defined by state and federal laws relating to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This school offers programs for students with disability depending on the physical ability of the handicapped student. We provide reasonable accommodation for the known disability of a qualified applicant, student, client, or employee except when the accommodation imposes an undue hardship on the school, other students, or employees. If you would like to request academic adjustment or auxiliary aids, please contact the school’s Chief Academic Officer.

Health & Safety Exemption Requirement

Homestead Schools adheres to all requirements pertaining to the protection of student information. However, there are limited exceptions to FERPA regulations under which the school is permitted to disclose education records or personally identifiable, non-directory information from education records in connection with a health or safety emergency without student consent.

The situation must present imminent danger to a student, other students, or members of the school community in order to qualify as an exception. This action is not taken lightly and only under circumstances that present imminent danger.

Voter’s Registration

The Program Participation Agreement (PPA) includes a voter registration requirement that applies to general elections and special elections for federal office, and to the elections of governors and other chief executives within a state.

You can pick up a voter registration form at your county elections office, library, or U.S. Post Office. It is important that your voter registration form be filled out completely and be postmarked or hand-delivered to your county elections office at least 15 days before the election. You will need to re-register to vote when you move to a new permanent residence or change your name.

Registered voters may apply for a vote-by mail ballot for an upcoming election at any time. If you apply by mail, your application must be received no later than 7 days before an election, otherwise you will need to apply in person to get a vote-by-mail ballot for that election. You can use the application printed on your Sample Ballot that is mailed to you by your county elections official prior to every election. If you don't want to wait for your sample ballot, you can write to your county elections official for an application or you may use the California Vote-By-Mail Ballot Application. Read the instructions, type your information directly into the application, then print, sign and date the application, and mail it to your county elections office.

Voter Registration Forms are available online at Election Assistance Commission Website www.eac.gov

You may receive voter registration forms from the Financial Aid Office.

EMERGENCY RESPONSE EVACUATION DISCLOSURE

Emergency Notifications

Emergency notification is triggered by an event that is currently occurring on or imminently threatening the school facilities. Emergency notification procedures are initiated for any significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees. Upon confirmation of a serious or emergency situation that poses an immediate threat to the health or safety of the campus community, a campus-wide notice will be disseminated, unless issuing a notification will, in the judgment of the responding authorities, compromise the efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency events that qualify for emergency notifications include, but are not limited to:

  • Outbreak of Meningitis, Norovirus, or other serious illness
  • Approaching extreme weather conditions
  • Earthquake
  • Gas leak
  • Terrorist incident
  • Active Shooter/Armed Intruder
  • Bomb Threat
  • Civil Unrest
  • Explosion
  • Nearby chemical or hazardous waste spill
  • Aircraft crash
  • Fire

The notification will be distributed as soon as possible. The authorized designee will determine an incident’s extent and scope, and whether it meets the criteria for an emergency notification. Once requested by a designated authority, notifications will be made as soon as practicable. All messages should include the type of situation, the location of the situation, the time and date, instructions for the recipient and an additional method for the public to obtain information. The following forms of communication may be used to provide emergency notifications:

  • E-mail
  • Text/voice messages
  • Website
  • Classroom’s door-to-door contact

Response and Evacuations

Homestead Schools has a plan that is designed to assist school in providing a safe learning environment. It focuses on the steps that can be taken to plan for various emergency scenarios. Preparedness involves the coordination of efforts between the school and the community at large. The School Emergency Teams develop the plan to meet individual school needs and implement the plan in the event of an emergency. Please see the published Emergency Preparedness Plan.

Fire & Evacuation Drill

Evacuation drills are monitored by the school emergency team leader. Reports are prepared by participating departments which identify deficient equipment so that repairs can be made immediately during meetings and during other educational sessions that they can participate in throughout the year. Annually, Homestead Schools conducts announced or unannounced drills to test the emergency response and evacuation procedures and to assess and evaluate the emergency evacuation plans and capabilities.

The purpose of evacuation drills is to prepare building occupants for an organized evacuation in case of an emergency. During the drill, occupants practice drill procedures and familiarize themselves with the location of exits. In addition to educating the occupants of each building about the evacuation procedures during the drills, the process also provides an opportunity to test the operation of fire alarm system components.

Homestead Schools will publish a summary of its emergency response and evacuation procedures in conjunction with at least one drill or exercise each calendar year following this table:

TIMELY WARNING EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION DISCLOSURES

Method of Disclosures

Hometead School annually distributes to all enrolled students and employees a notice of the availability of the information that is required to be made available.

Federal regulations set forth by the Higher Education Act require the disclosure of certain consumer information each year to prospective and enrolled students. Homestead Schools provides the following consumer information disclosures on the website at www.homesteadschools.net and school catalog. If you need assistance obtaining the information listed on the website or to receive a paper copy of the information, please contact the Financial Aid Office by phone at (310) 791-9975 or by e-mail at info@homesteadschools.com.

Paper copies are available from the Financial Aid office Monday thru Friday from 9:00am until 4:30pm.

For more information about Consumer Information Notice click here.

For information about Student Body Diversity click here.

Copyright Infringement Policies & Sanctions

Copyright infringement is the act of exercising, without permission or legal authority, one or more of the exclusive rights granted to the copyright owner under section 106 of the Copyright Act (Title 17 of the United States Code). These rights include the right to reproduce or distribute a copyrighted work. In the file-sharing context, downloading or uploading substantial parts of a copyrighted work without authority constitutes an infringement.

Criminal Penalties for Violation of Federal Copyright Laws Penalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties. In general, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either actual damages or "statutory" damages affixed at not less than $750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringed. For "willful" infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorneys' fees.

For details, see Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504, 505. Willful copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per offense. All equipment, services and technologies provided to students as part of the school’s computer system constitute the exclusive property of Homestead Schools. Similarly, all information composed, transmitted, received or stored via the school’s computer system is also considered the property of Homestead Schools. As such, all stored information is subject to disclosure to management, law enforcement and other third parties, with or without notice to the student.

Students are responsible for complying with copyright law and applicable licenses that apply to software, files, documents, messages and other material they wish to download, copy, or transmit. This includes peer-to-peer sharing of files and applications. All students obtaining access to any material prepared or created by another company or individual must respect any attached copyrights and may not copy, retrieve, modify or forward such copyrighted materials, except with written permission of the lawful owner. Students receiving electronic files via the school’s e-mail system or Internet connection should ensure that the sender is the lawful owner or has obtained the necessary license or permission.

The school monitors and filters all internet activity and provides regular reports of internet use to the office of the President. Therefore, to avoid disciplinary or criminal consequences, students should be very careful to investigate any material obtained via the Internet to be sure it is legal before copying. Students found to be in violation of any part of the policy will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal from the school.

Homestead Schools shall notify students and employees annually of the school’s obligation to combat illegal file sharing and the information available on this disclosure.

Academic Program Information

Homestead Schools offer the following programs:

Program

Total Hours

Credential Awarded

Type of Delivery

RN-BSN

1088(60 Credit Hours)

BSN Degree Residential, Online*, Blended
Vocational Nursing

1632

Diploma Residential
Medical Assisting

720

Diploma Residential
Nurse Assistant Training

150

Certificate Residential
Home Health Aide

40

Certificate Residential

*Please see the RN-BSN Faculty Orientation Manual for instructional materials/methods used, and the student-faculty interaction in distance education.

The School’s Physical Facilities

The school’s physical facilities are adequate to meet the school’s mission and the goals of the educational programs and are sufficient for the operation of the programs.

Click here for more details.

Classrooms

There are four (4) classrooms equipped with overhead projector,

*Please see the RN-BSN Faculty Orientation Manual for instructional materials/methods used, and the student-faculty interaction in distance education.

The School’s Physical Facilities

The school’s physical facilities are adequate to meet the school’s mission and the goals of the educational programs and are sufficient for the operation of the programs.

Click here for more details.

Classrooms

There are four (4) classrooms equipped with overhead projector,

LCD projector, and computer.

Program

Square Footage:

Capacity:

110

455

30 students
113

441

30 students
116

584

30 students
130

304

15 students

 

 

 

 

 

Skills Laboratory

There are three skills lab with a total of six (6) patient’s care units and adequate supplies and equipment.

Skills Lab 1: (Room 127)

Square Footage:

Capacity:

# of Patient Care Unit: Capacity/Unit:
523

30 Students

2

5 Students

Skills Lab 2: (Room 130)

Square Footage:

294

20 Students

2

5 Students

Skills Lab 3:

Square Footage:

200

15 Students

2

5 Students

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE INFORMATION

Federal Pell Grant

A Federal Pell Grant, unlike a loan, does not have to be repaid. Pell Grants are awarded usually only to undergraduate students who have not earned a bachelor's or a professional degree. (In some cases, however, a student enrolled in a post-baccalaureate teacher certification program might receive a Pell Grant.) Pell Grants are considered a foundation of federal financial aid, to which aid from other federal and nonfederal sources might be added.

How much can I get?

The maximum Pell Grant award for the 2019-2020 award year (July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020) is $6,195. The amount you get, though, will depend not only on your financial need, but also on your costs to attend school, your status as a full-time or part-time student, and your plans to attend school for a full academic year or less.
Note: The maximum award amount is given for any Pell Grant eligible student whose parent or guardian died as a result of military service in Iraq or Afghanistan after Sept.11, 2001. You must be under 24 years old or enrolled at least part-time in college at the time of your parent's or guardian's death.

How to Apply for Federal Student Aid

You must complete and submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid(FAFSASM) to apply for federal student aid and most state and college aid. FAFSA on the WebSM is the quickest and easiest method of applying.To go to FAFSA website click here

Federal Student Aid Forms

The Federal Student Aid Forms section has information on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) filing options, deadlines for applying, a sample paper FAFSA, FAFSA on the Web Worksheet, and student loan deferment and forbearance forms. Check out federal student aid forms by clicking HERE.

Am I eligible to receive financial assistance?

Age is not a factor in determining eligibility for the Federal Student Aid programs. To learn more click here.
Your school can apply Pell Grant funds to your school costs, pay you directly (usually by check), or combine these methods. The school must tell you in writing how much your award will be and how and when you'll be paid. Schools must disburse funds at least once per term (semester, trimester, or quarter). Schools that do not use semesters, trimesters, or quarters must disburse funds at least twice per academic year.

What are the eligibility requirements for a parent to get a Direct PLUS Loan?

* You must be the biological or adoptive parent (or, in some cases, the stepparent) of the student for whom you are borrowing.

* Your child must be a dependent undergraduate student who is enrolled at least half-time at a school that participates in the Direct Loan Program. Generally, your child is considered dependent if he or she is under 24 years of age, has no dependents, and is not married, a veteran, a graduate or professional degree student, or a ward of the court. Learn about dependency status at StudentAid.gov/dependency .

*You cannot have an adverse credit history (a credit check will be done).

*In addition, you and your child must be U.S. citizens or eligible noncitizens (see StudentAid.gov/noncitizen ), not be in default on any federal education loans, not owe an overpayment on a federal education grant, and meet other general eligibility requirements for the federal student aid programs.

For more information about PLUS Loan, Click Here

For more information about Master Promissory Note, Click Here

How much can I borrow?

It depends on your year in school and whether you have a subsidized orunsubsidized Direct Loan. A subsidized loan is awarded on the basis offinancial need. If you're eligible for a subsidized loan, the government will pay (subsidize) the interest on your loan while you're in school,for the first six months after you leave school, and if you qualify tohave your payments deferred. Depending on your financial need, you may borrow subsidized money for an amount up to the annual loan borrowing limit for your level of study (see below).

You might be able to borrow loan funds beyond your subsidized loan amount even if you don't have demonstrated financial need. In that case, you'd receive an unsubsidized loan. Your school will subtract the total amount of your other financial aid from your cost of attendance to determine whether you're eligible for an un subsidized loan. Unlike a subsidized loan, you are responsible for the interest from the time the unsubsidized loan is disbursed until it's paid in full. You can choose to pay the interest or allow it to accrue (accumulate) and becapitalized (that is, added to the principal amount of your loan).Capitalizing the interest will increase the amount you have to repay.

You can receive a subsidized loan and an unsubsidized loan for the sameenrollment period as long as you don't exceed the annual loan limits.

If you're a dependent undergraduate student (excluding students whose parents cannot borrow PLUS Loans), each year you can borrow up to:

    1. $5,500 if you're afirst-year student enrolled in a program of study that is at least afull academic year. No more than $3,500 of this amount can be in subsidized loans.
    1. $6,500 if you've completed your first year of study and the remainder of your program is at least a full academic year. No more than $4,500 of this amount can be in subsidized loans.
    1. $7,500 if you've completed two years of study and the remainder of your program is at least a full academic year. No more than $5,500 of this amount can be in subsidized loans.

If you're an independent undergraduate student (and a dependent student whose parents have applied for but were unable to get a PLUS Loans)(a parent loan)), each year you can borrow up to:

    1. $9,500 if you're a first-year student enrolled in a program of study that is at least a full academic year. No more than $3,500 of this amount may be insubsidized loans.
    1. $10,500 if you've completed your first year of study and the remainder of your program is at least a full academic year. No more than $4,500 of this amount may be in subsidized loans.
    1. $12,500 if you've completed two years of study and the remainder of your program is at least a full academic year. No more than $5,500 of this amount may be in subsidized loans.

These amounts are the maximum yearly amounts you can borrow in both subsidized and unsubsidized Direct Loans, individually or in combination. Because you can't borrow more than your cost of attendance minus the amount of any Federal Pell Grant you're eligible for and minus any other financial aid you'll get, you may receive less than the annual maximum amounts.

How will I get the loan money?

For the Direct Loan , you'll be paid through your school in at least two installments. No installment may exceed one-half of your loan amount. Your loan money must first be applied to pay for tuition and fees, room and board, and other school charges. If loan money remains, you'll receive the funds by check or in cash, unless you give the school written authorization to hold the funds until later in the enrollment period.

Generally, if you're a first-year undergraduate student and a first-time borrower, your school cannot disburse your first payment until 30 days after the first day of your enrollment period. This practice ensures you won't have a loan to repay if you don't begin classes or if you withdraw during the first 30 days of classes.

A school with a cohort default rate of less than 10 percent for each of the three most recent fiscal years for which data are available are not required to delay the delivery or disbursement of the first disbursement of a loan for 30 days for first-time, first year undergraduate borrowers.

Disbursement and Credit Balance Information

On the date of the disbursement, Homestead Schools’ Business Office will request funds through the G5 system. Once the funds are transferred to the School’s account, funds will then be applied to each individual’s student account. After each disbursement, students are sent a written notice that funds were received and applied to their account. This notice is sent within 30 days after funds were applied to student’s account.

What is a credit balance?

A credit balance is the amount of money, usually from financial aid, that remains after a student's charges are paid in full. Students with credit balance will receive a check of that amount within 14 days after all school related charges had been satisfied.

Professional Judgment Policy

Professional Judgment refers to the authority of a school's financial aid administrator to make adjustments to the data elements on the FAFSA and to override a student's dependency status. The school does not have the authority to change the need analysis formula itself or to make direct adjustments to the Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Instead, the school may make adjustments to the inputs to the formula. The changes to the inputs are dictated by the impact of the special circumstances on the family's income and assets. The standard formula is then applied to the new data elements, yielding a new EFC figure. Professional Judgment is on a case by case basis only. Students requesting Professional Judgment will need to supply written official documents to support the request.

What is a credit balance?

A credit balance is the amount of money, usually from financial aid, that remains after a student's charges are paid in full. Students with credit balance will receive a check of that amount within 14 days after all school related charges had been satisfied.

Professional Judgment Policy

Professional Judgment refers to the authority of a school's financial aid administrator to make adjustments to the data elements on the FAFSA and to override a student's dependency status. The school does not have the authority to change the need analysis formula itself or to make direct adjustments to the Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Instead, the school may make adjustments to the inputs to the formula. The changes to the inputs are dictated by the impact of the special circumstances on the family's income and assets. The standard formula is then applied to the new data elements, yielding a new EFC figure. Professional Judgment is on a case by case basis only. Students requesting Professional Judgment will need to supply written official documents to support the request.

Dependency Overrides

Financial aid administrators have the authority, through Section 480(d)(7) of the Higher Education Act, to change a student's status from dependent to independent in cases involving unusual circumstances.

Collecting and Maintaining Acceptable Documentation

Third party written documentation supporting a student's unusual circumstances is generally required. However, we understand that there may be some instances where the only documentation available to the financial aid administrator is a statement by the student. In these limited cases, the student's statement must include the facts related to the student's unusual circumstances, and the institution must include any other pertinent facts in writing.

Financial Aid Administrator's Written Determination

After reviewing all relevant documentation related to a student's assertion that there are unusual circumstances that support why he or she should be considered to be independent rather than dependent, the financial aid administrator must make a specific determination for the student. Upon making such a determination that a dependency override is warranted, the financial aid administrator must prepare a written statement of that determination, including the identification of the specific unusual circumstance upon which the financial aid administrator based his or her determination. The institution must maintain this documentation and the supporting documentation used to make each determination.

In particular, the following circumstances do not merit a dependency override, either alone or in combination:

    • Parents refuse to contribute to the student's education;
    • Parents are unwilling to provide information on the application or for verification;
    • Parents do not claim the student as a dependent for income tax purposes;
    • Student demonstrates total self-sufficiency.

Note that all of these circumstances are largely discretionary in nature. A student cannot become independent just because the parents are unwilling to help pay for the student's college education.

Although these circumstances are not sufficient for a dependency override, they do not preclude it. Sometimes there are additional circumstances that occur in conjunction with these circumstances that do merit a dependency override. These can include the following:

        • an abusive family environment (e.g., sexual, physical, or mental abuse or other forms of domestic violence)
        • abandonment by parents
        • incarceration or institutionalization of both parents
        • parents lacking the physical or mental capacity to raise the child
        • parents whereabouts unknown or parents cannot be located
        • parents hospitalized for an extended period
        • an unsuitable household (e.g., child removed from the household and placed in foster care)
        • married student's spouse dies or student gets divorced

Homestead Schools Verification Policy 2018-2019

To ensure that limited financial aid funds are awarded to eligible students in an equitable and consistent manner, Homestead Schools has developed policies for verification of family reported information. Requirements for verification of family-reported information for purposes of qualifying for financial aid must be cost effective, flexible, and based upon acceptance of a reasonable tolerance range for error applied to award amounts. Verification procedures will be uniformly applied to all financial aid programs which require demonstrated financial need as eligibility criterion.

Who?

Homestead Schools will verify all students selected for verification by the Department of Education. In addition, we will resolve all comments on the ISIR, and conflicting documentation. The Homestead Schools Financial Aid Staff may also question any aspect of an application.

What?

For applicants undergoing verification, Homestead Schools will verify the items specified in the 34 CFR Part 668.56. Specifically, these items include for Title IV applicants:

            • U.S. income tax data
            • Number enrolled in college;
            • Household size;
            • Certain untaxed income and benefits:
              • Child support
              • Food stamps (SNAP)
              • IRA/Keogh deductions
              • Tax-exempt interest
              • Untaxed portions of pensions
              • Payments to tax-deferred pension/savings plans (found on W-2)

Additional items will also be verified when there is conflicting documentation on file or items selected by Homestead Schools Financial Aid Staff.

Students' Responsibilities

It will be the student's responsibility to ensure that all documents requested are submitted with proper signatures. If a student’s dependency status changes during the award year, updating will occur unless that change is as a result of a change in marital status. Household size and number in postsecondary education can only be updated during the verification process.

Documentation

Documentation will consist of signed copies of the completed and signed appropriate requested forms. Some exceptions to documentation may be made in conjunction with what is allowed by federal regulation. The Federal Department of Education has instituted some changes to the verification process regarding income-tax return data as follows:

            • Students and parents can no longer submit a signed paper copy of the IRS 1040 as a way to confirm the income reported on the FAFSA. When completing the income sections of the FAFSA, the applicant is given the option to have this data retrieved directly from the IRS.
            • If the applicant decides not to use the IRS data retrieval process and the application is chosen for verification, the applicant and the parents will be required to submit an IRS tax transcript.
            • If the IRS tax retrieved information is changed on the FAFSA, the applicant will be required to submit an IRS tax transcript.
            • However, the IRS data can be retrieved by the applicant when a correction is made to the FAFSA. If the retrieved data is not changed, then an IRS tax transcript will not be required.
            • The applicant must have a 2015 IRS tax return on file with the IRS.

Tax Filers with Special Circumstances – The IRS Tax Retrieval may not be available for the applicant in the following circumstances:

            • A joint tax return was filed for 2015 and the student or the student’s parents have filed the FAFSA with a marital status of separated, divorced or widowed.
            • If the tax filer is married to someone other than the individual included on the 2015 joint tax return.
            • If the parent or student was not married in 2015 but is married at the time the FAFSA is filed. The current spouse’s income must be reported on the FAFSA.
            • If the parents or the student is married but filed tax returns separately.
            • If an amended tax return was filed.

Requesting an IRS Tax Transcript– There are three ways tax filers can request a tax transcript.

            • Online Go to www.irs.gov - A paper transcript will be mailed to the requestor within 5 to 10 days. Please sign the tax transcript and send it to the Office of Financial Aid at NMSU.
            • Telephone  (800) 908‐9946 - A paper transcript will be mailed to the requestor within 5 to 10 days. Please sign the tax transcript and send it to the Office of Financial Aid at NMSU.
            • IRS Form 4506T-EZ 4506TEZ  forms can be downloaded from http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f4506tez.pdf. A paper transcript will be mailed to the requestor within 5 to 10 days. Please sign the tax transcript and send it to the Office of Financial Aid at HOMESTEAD SCHOOLS. **Transcripts ordered using this method can be mailed directly to HOMESTEAD SCHOOLS by the IRS only if the tax filer requests this on line #5, in which case the signature would be waived.
            • IRS Data Availability –   In general, tax filers can anticipate that the IRS data will be available within:
              • Two weeks if the tax return has been filed electronically
              • • Eight weeks if the tax returns have been mailed.

If the tax filer has changed or corrected the federal income tax return, the amended information may not be available through the IRS data retrieval process. You will be required to submit both the original IRS tax transcript as well as the amended IRS tax account transcript.

If An IRS 1040 Will not and is not required to be filed The filers must attest that an IRS 1040 has not and will not be filed and that the IRS 1040 is not required to be filed. Copies of all W-2 forms from all employers must be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid at HOMESTEAD SCHOOLS.

Applicants filing a Puerto Rico tax return or a foreign tax return may not use the IRS Tax Retrieval and must send a copy of their 2011 tax documents.

Food Stamp Recipients Recipients of Food Stamps, also known as Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) may be asked to provide the Office of Financial Aid with documentation that Food Stamps were received (FAFSA Question #75. If documentation is not provided when requested, there may be additional income and asset information requested by the Office of Financial Aid.

Child Support Paid Applicants, who have been chosen for verification and who have indicated that child support was paid by the filer during 2015, the filer must confirm the amounts of child support paid, to whom the payments were made, and the names and address of the children receiving the child support.

Time Period

No Title IV aid will be released until the student has completed any required verification process.

Interim Disbursements

No Title IV aid will be released until the student has completed any required verification process.

Consequences

If a student fails to provide documentation or information within the required time frame, no Title IV aid will be released.

Tolerances

For the Federal Pell Grant Program, the tolerance values will be used in order to pay a student. If the student does not qualify for payment options based on tolerance, then a correction must be filed with the Central Processor.

Notification

Students are notified by phone or in person. All students applying for financial aid are to be verified by the school.

Referral Procedures

If it is determined that a student has received funds that they were not entitled to receive, the student must repay the amount. If a repayment is not made, the overpayment will be referred to the US Department of Education.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy (updated as of July 1, 2011 per the DOE guidelines)

Homestead Schools, in compliance with Federal and state regulations, requires that all students maintain satisfactory academic progress toward the completion of a degree, diploma, or certificate in order to be eligible to receive financial aid and remain in good academic standing and continue their enrollment. This SAP policy is applied consistently to all students of Homestead Schools regardless of whether or not federal aid is received by the students.

VOCATIONAL NURSING

Federal guidelines require that financial aid recipients maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) in order to remain eligible for Title IV federal student aid. This SAP policy is applied consistently to all Vocational Nursing (VN) students at Homestead Schools, regardless of whether or not federal student aid is received by the student. The VN program requires 1632 hours for completion. Satisfactory academic progress for full time students will be measured every term. This SAP is based on the Evaluation Methodology for Student Progress (EMSP) in the VN program. Student meeting the EMSP will meet the SAP policy and thus will remain eligible for federal student aid.

Homestead Schools has an SAP policy that monitors:

            1. Quality – Required Grade Averages

At the end of each increment, the cumulative grade average will be determined and documented in each student’s official record.  Students with a 76 or above grade point average (GPA) as specified in the chart below will be considered to be making satisfactory academic progress.  Earning a grade of 75.9 or below in any theoretical subject within a period will have earned a “Failed” grade in that subject. Students who failed a theoretical subject can re-take the failed subject to improve his or her overall GPA to meet the SAP requirements as specified in the chart below provided they don’t exceed the 150% maximum timeframe allowed to complete the program.

In the event students fail to meet the cumulative 76% GPA for the 1st Period of the 1st Academic Year (AY), the student will be on “Financial Aid WARNING” status.  Students will be allowed to continue into the 2nd Period of the 1st Academic Year of the program and receive financial aid. Students must then have a cumulative 76% GPA from 1st Period and 2nd Period to remain eligible for financial aid and to avoid termination from the program.

In the event students fail to meet the cumulative 76% GPA for the 2nd Period of the 1st Academic Year, the student will be on “Financial Aid WARNING” status.  Students will be allowed to continue into the 1st Period of the 2nd Academic Year of the program and receive financial aid. Students must then have a cumulative 76% GPA from 2nd Period of the 1st AY and 1st Period of the 2nd AY to remain eligible for financial aid and to avoid termination from the program.

In the event students fail to meet the cumulative 76% GPA for the 1st Period of the 2nd Academic Year, the student will be on “Financial Aid WARNING” status.  Students will be allowed to continue into the 2nd Period of the 2nd Academic Year of the program and receive financial aid. Students must then have a cumulative 76% GPA from 1st Period of the 2nd AY and 2nd Period of the 2nd AY to remain eligible for financial aid and to avoid termination from the program.

Students terminated from the program and ineligible for financial aid can re-establish eligibility by successfully completing the required number of hours and by attaining the overall required cumulative grade average before the next period.  Withdrawal from school has no effect on the student’s satisfactory academic progress upon re-entering

Annual Security Report

To view Annual Security Report
2017 Click Here... 2018 Click Here... 2019 Click Here...

DRUG AND ALCOHOL PREVENTION PROGRAM INFORMATION

To view DAAPP Annual Information
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In compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace and Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act, Homestead Schools is dedicated to the safety, health and welfare of its students, faculty and staff. The unlawful use and or abuse of drugs and alcohol can have a negative impact on the safety and well-being of college students and on our Homestead Schools (HS) educational environment.

The primary purpose of the following guidelines are in support of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program (DAAPP) developed and implemented in an effort to prevent the unlawful possession, use, and distribution of drugs and alcohol on campus and at recognized events and activities. The College aspires to educate, call our community to action, help those in need, and be in full compliance with the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (34 CFR Part 86) of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA).

Guidelines

I. Entities Affected by this Policy

Persons covered by the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program (DAAPP)are employees of HS and students who enroll in one or more classes for any type of academic credit except for continuing education units.

II. Standard for Student Conduct

HS complies with local, state, and federal laws and penalties regarding the unlawful use of drugs and alcohol including the possession of illegal drugs and drug paraphernalia on college premises and the sale or use of alcoholic beverages on HS premises. (Please see Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations in School Catalog)

III. Disciplinary Procedures

HS believes it is the responsibility of all employees and students to report prohibited use or abuse of drugs and alcohol. If a student/employee is suspected of violating the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations of the HS, the College will perform an investigation to determine the appropriate course of action. An Incident Report (student or employee) detailing alleged violations of the Standards of Conduct by an HS student/employee will need to be completed to initiate the Disciplinary Actions/Due Process procedures.

IV. Disciplinary Sanctions

Violations of the HS Standards of Conduct refer to a student’s failure to meet his/her responsibilities and are subject to General Disciplinary Action in accordance with college policy as stated in the HS Student Handbook and School Catalog.

Sanctions The School Director has the authority to issue sanction(s) including, but not limited to, the following:

  1. Written reprimand
  2. Loss of privileges/access
  3. Removal from course/s
  4. Warning
  5. Suspension
  6. Expulsion
  7. Termination (employee)
  8. Referral for prosecution (student and/or employee)

VI. Program Resources for Individual and Group Counseling

A list of local resources with descriptions of drug and alcohol counseling treatment, rehabilitation or reentry programs available to students are provided Read More....

VII. Oversight Responsibility

The school director and financial aid director shall serve as the main contacts that will have oversight responsibility of the Student DAAPP including, but not limited to: updates, coordination of information required in the DAAPP, coordination of the annual notification to students, and the biennial review report.

VIII. Assessment of Program Effectiveness and Biennial Report

The school director and financial aid director will review documented infractions of the student conduct policy on an annual basis. The assessment includes reviewing the incident(s) and the outcome(s) to ensure that college policy regarding drug, alcohol and other substance abuse violations and sanctions are imposed and consistently enforced.

The school director and financial aid director will conduct an annual review to determine program effectiveness and implement changes as necessary. The school director and financial aid director will prepare a biennial review report as required to be in full compliance with the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) 34 CFR Part 86.100.

A review of the number of documented cases regarding students of concerns referred through HS’s behavioral intervention team(s) will be gathered for statistical purposes and to ensure prevention and awareness activities are delivered appropriately to all student populations.

Under the leadership of the school director an assessment to measure student perceptions and behavior will be conducted periodically. These data will be analyzed to continuously determine the most appropriate interventions.

IX. Policy History

The DAAPP for students and policy with accompanied guidelines will be reviewed on an annual basis to ensure that it accurately reflects institutional policy, procedures and programs; and to consider expansion of evaluation, prevention, and awareness activities.

X. Related Documents

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program (DAAPP) Drug Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (34 CFR Part 86) Drug Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA) Administrative Rule

XI. Health Risks Associated with Alcohol and Drugs

 

STUDENT-RIGHT-TO-KNOW-ACT

Student Right-to-Know disclosures must be made by July 1 of each Year. The Student Right-to­ Know Act requires schools to disclose

Completion or graduation rates and, if applicable, transfer out rates for a specific cohort of the general student body. This cohort is of certificate- or degree-seeking, full-time ,first­ time undergraduate students. Please click HERE.

The institution must provide information on the diversity of the student body, including the percentage of enrolled, full-time students who are male, female, self-identified members of a major racial or ethic group, and Federal Pell Grant recipients. The institution must disclose enrollment information disaggregated by gender, major racial and ethic subgroup, recipients of a Federal Pell Grant, recipients of Direct Subsidized Loan, students who did not receive a Pell Grant, and students who did not receive either a Pell Grant or a Direct Subsidized Loan. 34 C.F.R. §§ 668.14(b)(13); 668.43; Higher Education Act (HEA) of 1965, as amended, Section 485.

Enrollment Disclosure

Reporting completion or graduation and transfer-out rates to the Department:

To calculate completion or graduation and transfer-out rates, a school must identify a group of students each year (a cohort) and review the performance of that cohort over time to determine the percentage of those students who complete their programs or transfer out of the school. The same snapshot approach is used to determine rates for both the general student body cohort and those rates related to students receiving athletically related student aid. Your school must report its completion or graduation rates every spring to the Department through the IPEDS Web site www.nces.ed.gov/ipeds

Disclosing and reporting information on completion or graduation rates for the general student body cohort:

The information on completion, graduation rates and, if applicable, transfer-out rates must be made available by the July 1 immediately following the 12-month period ending August 31 during which the expiration of 150% of normal time took place for the group of students on which the school bases its completion and transfer-out rate calculation. Schools must disseminate the information on completion or graduation and, if applicable, transfer-out rates to enrolled and prospective students upon request, through appropriate publications, mailings, or electronic media (for example, school catalogs or admissions literature). Schools are strongly encouraged to provide this information to other interested parties, such as guidance counselors, upon request.

Gainful Employment Program Disclosure

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt students who completed the program, and other important information, please Click Here

For more information about our retention rates, please Click Here

For more information about our School Performance Fact Sheet, please Click Here

CONSUMER INFORMATION: CLERY ACT (CAMPUS SECURITY)

To view Campus Safety & Security Survey Click Here...

Student Records Management & Retention

Homestead Schools is in compliance with provisions granted under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Under this law, students enrolled in any educational institution are given certain rights concerning school records.

This privacy right is a right vested in the student. Generally:

  1. Institutions must have written permission from the student in order to release any information from a student's educational record.
  2. Institutions may disclose directory information in the student's educational record without the student's consent.
  3. It is good policy for the institution to notify the student about such disclosure and to seek the written permission of the student to allow disclosure of any educational records including directory information.
  4. Institutions should give the student ample opportunity to submit a written request that the school refrain from disclosing directory information about them.
  5. Institutions must not disclose non-directory information about students without their written consent except in very limited circumstances.
  6. Institutions should notify students about their rights under FERPA through annual publications the student about the disclosure.
  7. The school should always seek a written consent from the student before disseminating educational records to third parties.

The Admissions and Records Office is responsible for ascertaining that school records maintenance, storage, security and management are in compliance with the Bureau’s record-keeping requirements, accrediting agencies’ and school’s policy, procedures, rules and regulations.

The institution maintains records for each student, whether or not the student completes the educational service, for a period of not less than five years at 23800 Hawthorne Blvd Suite 200 Torrance, CA after the date of the student's graduation, withdrawal, or termination.

The student records shall be retrievable by student name and shall contain all of the following applicable information:

  1. Home/mailing address, e-mail address, and telephone number
  2. Written records and transcripts of any formal education or training relevant to the student's qualifications for admission to the institution
  3. Copies of all documents signed by the student, including contracts, instruments of indebtedness, and documents relating to financial aid
  4. Copies of all tests given the student before admission
  5. Records of the dates of enrollment and, if applicable, withdrawal, leaves of absence, and graduation
  6. A transcript showing all of the classes and courses or other educational services that were completed or were attempted but not completed and grades or evaluations given to the student for each course or subject
  7. Copy of certificate granted and the date on which that certificate was granted
  8. A document showing the total amount of money received from or on behalf of the student and the date or dates on which the money was received
  9. A document specifying the amount of a refund, including the amount refunded for tuition and the amount for equipment, the method of calculating the refund, the date the refund was made, the check number of  the refund, and the name and address of the person or entity to which the refund was sent
  10. Copies of any official advisory notices or warnings regarding the student's progress
  11. Complaints received from the student, including any correspondence, notes, memoranda, or telephone logs relating to a complaint. (All notices and disclosures provided to students and a record of the time period within which each notice and disclosure was provided)
  12. Records of student attendance
  13. Satisfactory academic progress report

Homestead Schools stores student records on computer disks, making records accessible through electronic retrieval. These records are in an electronic format that are readily available and open to inspection by the Bureau upon request.
Printed copies of student records, historical and contemporary, are readily available as well. All hard copy records are maintained in fire-retardant storage cabinets.
The institution also maintains complete and accurate records of all the educational programs offered and the curriculum for each, and information of all previous and current faculty and staff files.
The institution has personnel scheduled to be present at all times during normal business hours who know how to operate the devices and can explain the operation of the devices to any person authorized to inspect and copy records.

The Chief Academic Officer conducts a quarterly checking to ascertain that the records management and retention are being properly handled.

Campus Safety and Crime Prevention

Homestead Schools is concerned about the safety and welfare of its students, faculty and staff, and visitors, and is committed to providing a safe and secure campus. The school has very little serious crime, but the potential exists. Homestead Schools has implemented policies and procedures designed to protect all persons on the campus.

The school has taken a number of steps to insure that our campus remains safe. Most recently, the school has completed installation of video surveillance cameras in all facilities of the school building.

The school is diligent in maintaining its buildings and grounds, with special concern for safety and security. Repairs of a safety and security nature are made promptly. For example, outdoor lights are checked on a regular basis to insure that burned out or damaged bulbs are replaced quickly.

In addition, each year classroom buildings are inspected by an outside expert to insure that the buildings meet state and federal fire code. Defects are given priority and repaired promptly.

The instructors, staff, and students are given basic training course in CPR and first aid in cases of emergency situations.

Smoke detectors and fire extinguishers have been strategically placed in all school buildings. Vandalizing the alarm system, covering smoke detectors or illegally discharging fire extinguishers are serious offenses. Every effort will be made to identify persons who compromise public safety through such acts.

In compliance with state regulations, students are given fire safety class as a required before the commencement of the program.In compliance with the Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, The following information pertaining to specific crime categories and geographic areas is reported.

Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (DFSCR)

The Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Regulations (Education Department General Administrative Regulations [EDGAR]), requires that, as a condition of receiving funds or any other form of financial assistance under any federal program, an institution of higher education (IHE) must certify that it has adopted and implemented a program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees. If audited, failure to comply with the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Regulations may cause an institution to forfeit eligibility for federal funding.

In order to be able to certify its compliance with the regulations, an institution must adopt and implement a drug prevention program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by all students and employees both on school premises and as part of any of its activities. Creating a program that complies with the regulations requires an IHE to do the following:

  • Annually notify each employee and student, in writing, of standards of conduct; a description of appropriate sanctions for violation of federal, state, and local law and campus policy; a description of health risks associated with AOD use; and a description of available treatment programs.
  • Develop a sound method for distributing annual notification information to every student and staff member each year. Conduct a biennial review on the effectiveness of its AOD programs and the consistency of sanction enforcement.
  • Maintain its biennial review material on file, so that, if requested to do so by the U.S. Department of Education, the campus can submit it.

Homestead Schools DFSCR policy addresses the legal and responsible use of alcohol. It addresses the academic, health, personal and safety risks associated with alcohol and other drug use through education, services and resources that focus on prevention of alcohol and other drug abuse. Through wide dissemination of this policy, the school community will be informed of its contents, as required by the Drug-Free Workplace and Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act.

It is a goal of the school to provide a safe, productive, and healthy environment in which all members of the school community can learn, work, and grow from a wealth of different school experiences. The school is determined to establish and maintain working, living, and learning conditions that are free from the negative effects of alcohol and other drug abuse. The school recognizes that the misuse or abuse of any drug can be detrimental to the health, safety, learning, and well-being of individuals as well as the school community. Therefore, in compliance with the U.S. Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, the school offers substance abuse prevention programs for its students and employees and will identify resources and provide assistance and support for those who have, developed or are in recovery from problems with AODs.

The illegal or abusive use of alcohol and/or other drugs by students, faculty or staff adversely affects school’s commitment to provide an environment of excellence in teaching, research and learning. As members of the school community, we all share in the responsibility for creating and maintaining a healthy and productive environment for work and study alike. With this responsibility comes the obligation to be involved in preventing problems caused by the abuse of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs.

Homestead Schools comprehensive approach to addressing substance abuse emphasizes:

  • Taking effective steps to create and maintain a drug-free workplace and educational environment for students, faculty and staff.
  • Providing continual prevention, education and counseling services along with referrals to off-campus treatment facilities as appropriate.
  • Encouraging individuals who are experiencing problems associated with alcohol and/or other drugs or chemical dependency to seek assessment, counseling and/or treatment voluntarily with the understand­ing that this assistance is confidential and will not be used against them.

School's policy on alcohol and other drug use respects all legal requirements including, but not limited to:

  • Federal and California controlled substance laws, as well as other administrative regulations concerning alcohol and other drugs.
  • The Drug–Free Workplace Act of 1988 sets forth special requirements for employees on federal contracts and grants. It requires the school to provide notice of a conviction;for a violation of any criminal drug statute occurring in the workplace by an employee engaged in the performance of work under federal contract or grant; and to report to the funding agency within ten calendar days after notice from an employee of a conviction for a violation of any drug statute occurring in the workplace.
  • California Drug Free Workplace Law. Employees or contractors of any state agency are prohibited from the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of a controlled substance as defined in the Controlled Substances Act. The employer or contractor must publish a statement regarding the prohibition and any sanctions that will be imposed and establish a drug-free awareness program.

Federal and California controlled substance laws, as well as other administrative regulations concerning alcohol and other drugs.

For more information about our customer information, clery act (campus safety), please Click Here...

For more information about our crime statistics, please Click Here

FERPA (FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT)

The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 commonly known as FERPA, is a federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. Students have specific, protected rights regarding the release of such record and FERPA requires that institutions adhere strictly to these guidelines. Therefore, it is imperative that the faculty and staff have a working knowledge of FERPA guidelines before releasing educational records.

FERPA gives students the following rights regarding educational records:

  • The right to access educational records kept by the school;
  • The right to demand educational records be disclosed only with student consent;
  • The right to amend educational records;
  • The right to file complaints against the school for  disclosing educational records in violation of FERPA.

Students have a right to know about the purpose, content, and location of information kept as a part of their educational records. They also have right to expect that information in their educational records will be kept confidential unless they give permission to the school to disclose such information. Therefore, it is important to understand how educational records are defined under FERPA. Educational records are defined by FERPA as:

Records that are kept in the sole possession of the [institution] , are used only as a memory aid, and are not accessible or revealed to any other person except a temporary substitute for the maker of the record.

Educational records are directly related to the student and are either maintained by the school or by a party or organization acting on behalf of the school. Such records may include:

  • Written documents; (including student advising folders)
  • Computer media;
  • Microfilm and microfiche;
  • Video or audio tapes or COs;
  • Film;
  • Photographs.

Any record that contains personally identifiable information that is directly related to the student is an educational record under FERPA. This information can also include records kept by the school in the form of student files, student system databases kept in storage devices such as servers, or recordings or broadcasts which may include student projects. The following items are not considered educational records under FERPA:

  • Private notes of individual staff or faculty; (NOT kept in student advising folders)
  • Campus police records;
  • Medical records;
  • Statistical data compilations that contain no mention of personally identifiable information about any specific student.

Faculty notes, data compilation, and administrative records kept exclusively by the maker of the records that are not accessible or revealed to anyone else are not considered educational records and, therefore, fall outside of the FERPA disclosure guidelines. However, these records may be protected under other state or federal laws such as the doctor/patient privilege.
There are two types of educational records as defined under FERPA. Each type of educational record is afforded different disclosure protections. Therefore, it is important for faculty and staff to know the type of educational record that is being considered for disclosure.

Some information in a student's educational record is defined as directory information under FERPA. Under a strict reading of FERPA, the school may disclose this type of information without the written consent of the student. However, the student can exercise the option to restrict the release of directory information by submitting a formal request to the school to limit disclosure. Directory information may include:

  • Name;
  • Address;
  • Phone number and email address;
  • Dates of attendance;
  • Degree(s) awarded;
  • Enrollment status;
  • Major field of study.

Though it is not specifically required by FERPA, institutions should always disclose to the student that such information is considered by the school to be directory information and, as such, may be disclosed to a third party upon request.

Non-directory information is any educational record not considered directory information. Non-directory information must not be released to anyone, including parents of the student, without the prior written consent of the student. Further, faculty and staff can access non­ directory information only if they have a legitimate ac8idemic need to do so. Non-directory information may include:

  • Social security numbers;
  • Student identification number;
  • Race, ethnicity, and/or nationality;
  • Gender
  • Transcripts; grade reports

Transcripts are non-directory information and, therefore, are protected educational records under FERPA. Students have a right to privacy regarding transcripts held by the school where third parties seek transcript copies. Institutions should require that students first submit a written request to have transcripts sent to any third party as the privilege of privacy of this information is held by the student under FERPA. Schools should never fax transcripts because this process cannot guarantee a completely secure transmission of the student's grades to third parties.

In general, a student's prior written consent is always required before institutions can legitimately disclose non-directory information. institutions may tailor a consent form to meet their unique academic needs. However, prior written consent must include the following elements:

  • Specify the records to be disclosed;
  • State the purpose of the disclosure;
  • Identify the party or class of parties to whom the disclosure is to be made;
  • The date;
  • The signature of the student whose record is to be disclosed;
  • The signature of the custodian of the educational record.

Prior written consent is not required when disclosure is made directly to the student or to other school officials within the same institution where there is a legitimate educational.

SAFEGUARDING CUSTOMER INFORMATION

Postsecondary educational institutions participating in the FSA programs are subject to the information security requirements established by the Federal Trade Commission for financial institutions.

All customer information is safeguarded. This requirement applies to all nonpublic personal information the school’s possession (from students, parents, or other individuals with whom the school has a customer relationship). It also pertains to the customers of other financial institutions that have provided such information to the school.

Homestead Schools establishes and maintains a comprehensive information security program. This program must include the administrative, technical, or physical safeguards the school uses to access, collect, distribute, process, protect, store, use, transmit, dispose of, or otherwise handle customer information. The school insures the security and confidentiality of customer information, protects against any anticipated threats or hazards to the security or integrity of such information and protects against unauthorized access to or use of such information that could result in substantial harm or inconvenience to any customer.

The school includes all required elements of an information security program:

  • Designated Coordinators—student services coordinator. The school designates an employee or employees to coordinate its information security program. Homestead Schools believes that confidentiality of consumer and/or parent information is of utmost importance.
  • No financial information or social security numbers with birth dates will be sent by email. Every employee has his/her own user id and password.
  • Social security numbers will be kept in locked files, in locked offices, as with student records. Wherever possible, personnel will attempt to limit the number of times a student’s SSN is recorded.
  • When office personnel steps away from their desk, all paperwork with personal information will be stored away and the individual will log off the computer.
  • Information to be disposed are shredded in pieces to ensure the safety of the person’s important information.
  • In case of suspected attack, intrusion or other system failure of some kind. The school has personnel to address the problem immediately. The technology team regularly updates it firewalls and system checks.
  • Other than homework or tests and teacher’s gradebooks, student data is not to leave the building on a laptop. Teacher tests or gradebooks should not contain personal identifiable information like a social security number, phone number, address, etc.
  • The school evaluates these procedures at least once a year or as any breech of security incidents occur. No service providers are used by the school at this time.

Fire Safety Reports and Student Housing

Homestead Schools does not provide on-campus student housing, so there is no information to provide.

MISREPRESENTATION

Nature of Education Program

Medical Assisting Transferrable Credit: Students should always check with the school regarding transferrable credits for Medical Assistant courses. Homestead Schools will consider transfer of credits from another school with the same Medical Assisting program. Courses taken in Medical Assisting will not be transferrable to Vocational Nursing.

Program Descriptions

Program descriptions are posted on the school’s website for VN (please Click Here ) and courses of study are available for review in the office.

Faculty

All instructors in Homestead Schools are approved by the BVNPT.

Nature of Financial Charges

Please see Gainful Employment Disclosure for more information.

Employability of Graduates

Please see Gainful Employment Disclosure for more information.

Relationship with ED

The US Dept. of Education has approved our programs to be Title IV eligible. This is not an endorsement of the quality of our educational programs.

LOAN DISCLOSURES

Note that all Federal Direct loans borrowed through Homestead Schools will be submitted to NSLDS and accessible by authorized agencies, lenders and institutions (HEOA 489 amended HEA Sec. 485B).

Student Loan Information Published by the U.S. Department of Education:

Eligible students will receive federal student aid loans under Direct Stafford Loan Program. For more information and for any questions regarding the FSA loan program please visit our Financial Aid Office between 8:00 am and 4:00 pm and speak to our Financial Aid Administrator or online by going to the following webpage: please Click Here

Title IV

Homestead Schools Refund Policy complies with the amended version of 34 CFR Section 668.22 of the Higher Education Amendment of 1998.

Title IV funds are awarded to a student under the assumption that the student will attend school for the entire period for which the assistance is awarded. When a student withdraws, the student may no longer be eligible for the full amount of Title IV funds that the student was originally scheduled to receive.

If a recipient of Title IV grant or loan funds withdraws from a school after beginning attendance, the amount of Title IV grant or loan assistance earned by the student must be determined. If the amount disbursed to the student is greater than the amount the student earned, unearned funds must be returned. If the amount disbursed to the student is less than the amount the student earned, and for which the student is otherwise eligible, he /she is eligible to receive a post-withdrawal disbursement of the earned aid that was not received.

The school’s Financial Aid Office is required by federal statute to recalculate federal financial aid eligibility for students who withdraw, drop out, are dismissed, or take a leave of absence prior to completing 60% of a payment period or term. The federal Title IV financial aid programs must be recalculated in these situations.
Students who withdraw from all classes prior to completing more than 60% of an enrollment term will have their eligibility for aid recalculated based on the percent of the term completed. For example, a student who withdraws completing only 30% of the term will have "earned" only 30% of any Title IV aid received. The school and/or the student must return the remaining 70%.
Recalculation is based on the percentage of earned aid using the following Federal Return of Title IV funds formula:

  • Percentage of payment period or term completed = The number of clock hours the student was scheduled to complete in the period divided by the total number of clock hours in the period.
    Up through the 60% point in each payment period a prorate schedule is used to determine the amount of Title IV funds the student has earned at the time of withdrawal. If a student withdraws after 60% (or more) of the term, he/she is considered to have "earned" all of the federal aid for the term. No repayment is necessary.

If a student after enrollment never attended any classes, he/she did not establish eligibility for any funds. All Title IV disbursed must be returned.
Refunds are allocated in the following order:

  1. Pell Grant
  2. FSEOG
  3. Unsubsidized Direct Stafford Loans (other than PLUS loans)
  4. Subsidized Direct Stafford Loans
  5. Direct PLUS Loans

When a student withdraws from Homestead Schools, the withdrawal date used to determine the refund is the date the student began the school's withdrawal process, although the school reserves the right to use the last date of attendance at an academically related activity as the withdrawal date.
The withdrawal date is:

  • First, the date the student began the institution’s withdrawal process or officially notifies the school of their intent to withdraw: or
  • Second, the last known attendance at a documented academically-related activity (i.e., exam, a tutorial, computer-assisted instruction, academic counseling, academic advisement, turning in a class assignment, or attending a study group that is assigned by the institution); or
  • Third, the midpoint of the period for a student who leaves without notifying the institution.

If a student earned less aid than was disbursed, the school would be required to return a portion of the funds and the student would be required to return a portion of the funds.
If a student earned more aid than was disbursed to him/her, the school would owe the student a post-withdrawal disbursement. A post-withdrawal disbursement must be made within 180 days of the date the school determines that the student withdrew.
The following rules apply when completing a return calculation for a student:

  • The school will return any unearned Title IV funds within 45 days of the date the school determined the student withdrew, and offer any post-withdrawal disbursement of loan funds within 30 days of that date.
  • The school will disburse any Title IV funds a student is due as part of post-withdrawal disbursement within 45 days of the date the school determined the student withdrew, and disburse any loan funds a student accepts within 180 days of that date.

The student is obligated to return any Title IV overpayment in the same order mentioned above. Students who owe overpayments as a result of withdrawals initially will retain their eligibility for Title IV funds for a maximum of 45 days from the earlier of the date of the school sends the student notice of the overpayment or the date the school was required to notify the student of the overpayment. Failure to return Title IV funds will result in the loss of eligibility for financial aid.

If the student is eligible for a loan guaranteed by the federal or state government and the student defaults on the loan, both of the following may occur:

National Student Loan Data SystemSM

The National Student Loan Data SystemSM (NSLDSSM) is the U.S. Department of Education's central database for student aid. NSLDS receives data from schools, guaranty agencies, the Direct Loan, Pell Grant, and other Department of Education programs. At NSLDS Student Access, aid recipients can view information on their loans and grants.
Check out federal student aid by click HERE.

Entrance Counseling

Entrance loan counseling sessions are required before the loan is disbursed. Students may come to the Financial Aid  Office  to get one on one counseling conducted by the Financial Aid Administrator and at the end, each student is required to complete a loan entrance counseling form.

Exit Counseling

To ensure fulfillment of the requirement of Exit Counseling, all students with Federal Direct Loan prior to completion of the program will be given the exit counseling handout. To ensure proper delivery of handout, the school will conduct a group exit counseling for graduating students prior to completion of the program. Students with Federal Direct Loan who withdrew from the program without notice will have the handout sent to them at the last known address on record. Students with Federal Direct Loan who dropped below half time will also need to complete Exit Counseling and will be provided the exit counseling handout as well. For students who successfully completed the program or officially withdrawn, the school as part of the exit process will collect from students successful exit counseling print out showing the student completed the exit counseling.

Stafford Loans (Direct Loans)

The U.S. Department of Education administers the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program. The Direct Loan programs consist of what are generally known as Stafford Loans (for students) and PLUS Loans for parents and graduate and professional degree students.

Under a bill signed by President Obama in March 2010, the FFEL program has been discontinued.

How can I get a Direct Loan?

For this type of loan, you must fill out a FAFSASM. After your FAFSA is processed, your school will review the results and will inform you about your loan eligibility. You also will have to sign a promissory note, a binding legal document that lists the conditions under which you're borrowing and the terms under which you agree to repay your loan.

What's the interest rate?

For all unsubsidized Stafford loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2019, the interest rate is fixed at 5.05 percent. The interest rate for subsidized Stafford loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2017 is fixed at 4.45 percent.This change from a variable to a fixed interest rate does not affect a borrower's variable interest rate on loans made before July 1, 2006.

Click here for the Direct Loan interest rates as of July 1, 2019.

Interest Rate Reductions

Over a three-year period beginning July 1, 2017, the interest rate on subsidized Stafford Loans made to undergraduate students will be reduced. The applicable interest rates for loans made during this period are as follows:

First disbursement of a loan:

Interest rate on the unpaid
balance

Made on or after

And made before

July 1, 2019

July 1, 2020

4.53 percent

July 1, 2018

July 1, 2019

5.05 percent

July 1, 2017

July 1, 2018

4.45 percent

These changes apply to subsidized Stafford loans first disbursed on or after July 1 of each year through June 30 of the next year. This change does not affect any prior loans made to borrowers; the terms and interest rates of those loans remain the same. These reduced interest rates apply only to subsidized loans; any unsubsidized Stafford Loan for the same undergraduate borrower would continue to be made at the current fixed interest rate of 6.8 percent.

Other than interest, is there a charge for this loan?

Yes, there is a loan fee on all Direct Subsidized Loans and Direct Unsubsidized Loans. The loan fee is a percentage of the loan amount and is proportionately deducted from each loan disbursement. The percentage varies depending on when the loan is first disbursed, as shown in the chart below.

Loan Fees for Direct Subsidized Loans and Direct Unsubsidized Loans

Loan Fee

First Disbursement Date

On or after Oct. 1, 2019, and before Oct. 1, 2020

1.059%

On or after Oct. 1, 2018, and before Oct. 1, 2019

1.062%

Loans first disbursed prior to Oct. 1, 2017, have different loan fees.

When do I pay back my Stafford Loans?

After you graduate, leave school, or drop below half-time enrollment, you will have a six-month "grace period" before you begin repayment. During this period, you'll receive repayment information, and you'll be notified of your first payment due date. You're responsible for beginning repayment on time, even if you don't receive this information. Payments are usually due monthly.

During the grace period on a subsidized loan, you don't have to pay any principal, and you won't be charged interest. During the grace period on an unsubsidized loan, you don't have to pay any principal, but you will be charged interest. You can either pay the interest or it will be capitalized (added to your principal loan balance, thus increasing the amount you'll repay).

How do I pay back my loans?

Your loan servicer handles all billing regarding your student loan, so you’ll need to make payments directly to your servicer. Each servicer has its own payment process and can work with you if you need help making payments.

What if I have trouble repaying the loan?

Under certain circumstances, you can receive a deferment or forbearance on your loan, as long as it's not in default. During a deferment, no payments are required. You won't be charged interest for a subsidized Direct Stafford loan. If you have an unsubsidized Stafford Loan, you are responsible for the interest during deferment.

Can my Stafford Loan ever be discharged (canceled)?

Yes, but only under a few circumstances. Your loan can't be canceled because you didn't complete the program of study at the school (unless you couldn't complete the program for a valid reason the school closed, for example), or because you didn't like the school or the program of study, or you didn't obtain employment after completing the program of study.

For more information about discharge, go to the Repayment Information section of this Web site.

PLUS Loans (Parent Loans)

Parents can borrow a PLUS Loan to help pay your education expenses if you are a dependent undergraduate student enrolled at least half time in an eligible program at an eligible school. PLUS Loans are available through the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program. Your parents must have an acceptable credit history.

How do my parents get a loan?

For a Direct PLUS Loan, your parents must complete a Direct PLUS Loan application and promissory note, contained in a single form that you get from your schools financial aid office.

Also, your parents generally will be required to pass a credit check. If your parents don't pass the credit check, they might still be able to receive a loan if someone, such as a relative or friend who is able to pass the credit check, agrees to endorse the loan. An endorser promises to repay the loan if your parents fail to do so. Your parents might also qualify for a loan without passing the credit check if they can demonstrate that extenuating circumstances exist. You and your parents must also meet other general eligibility requirements for federal student financial aid.

How much can my parents borrow?

The yearly limit on a PLUS Loan is equal to your cost of attendance minus any other financial aid you receive. If your cost of attendance is $6,000, for example, and you receive $4,000 in other financial aid, your parents can borrow up to $2,000.

Who gets my parents' loan money?

The U.S. Department of Education (for a Direct PLUS Loan) will send the loan funds to your school. Your school might require your parents to endorse a disbursement check and send it back to the school. In most cases, the loan will be disbursed in at least two installments, and no installment will be greater than half the loan amount. The funds will first be applied to your tuition, fees, room and board, and other school charges. If any loan funds remain, your parents will receive the amount as a check or in cash, unless they authorize the amount to be released to you or to be put into your school account. Any remaining loan funds must be used for your education expenses.

What's the interest rate?

For PLUS Loans disbursed on or after 7/1/19 and before 6/30/20, the interest rate is fixed at 7.08% for Direct PLUS Loans. For 2019-2020, the variable rate for these PLUS Loans is 7%. Interest is charged on a PLUS Loan from the date of the first disbursement until the loan is paid in full.

Other than interest, is there a charge to get a PLUS Loan?

Your parents will pay a fee of up to 4.248% of the loan, deducted proportionately each time a loan disbursement is made. For a Direct PLUS Loan, the entire fee goes to the government to help reduce the cost of the loans. Also, your parents may be charged collection costs and late fees if they don't make their loan payments when scheduled.

When do my parents begin repaying the loan?

For PLUS loans made to parents that are first disbursed on or after July 1, 2019, the borrower has the option of beginning repayment on the PLUS loan either 60 days after the loan is fully disbursed or wait until six months after the dependent student on whose behalf the parent borrowed ceases to be enrolled on at least a half-time basis.

How do my parents pay back these loans?

They'll repay their Direct PLUS Loan to the U.S. Department of Education's Direct Loan Servicing Center.

Is it ever possible to postpone repayment of a PLUS Loan?

Yes, under certain circumstances, your parents can receive a deferment on their loans.

If they temporarily cant meet the repayment schedule, they can also receive forbearance on their loan, as long as it isn't in default. During forbearance, their payments are postponed or reduced.

Generally, the conditions for eligibility and procedures for requesting a deferment or forbearance apply to both Stafford Loans and PLUS Loans. However, since all PLUS Loans are unsubsidized, your parents will be charged interest during periods of deferment or forbearance. If they don't pay the interest as it accrues, it will be capitalized (that is, added to the principal amount of the loan, and additional interest will be based on that higher amount).

Can a PLUS Loan be discharged (canceled)?

Yes, under certain conditions. A discharge (cancellation) releases your parents from all obligation to repay the loan.

Your parents PLUS Loan cant be canceled for these reasons: You didn't complete your program of study at your school (unless you couldn't complete the program for a valid reason because the school closed, for example), you didn't like the school or the program of study, or you didn't obtain employment after completing the program of study.

Loan Discharge (Cancellation)

In certain circumstances, your loan can be discharged/canceled. Read about cancellation provisions here.

Repayment Plans

Work with your loan servicer to choose a federal student loan repayment plan that's best for you. To make your payments more affordable, repayment plans can give you more time to repay your loans or can be based on your income.

To know more about the different kinds of Repayment plans Click here

Repayment Estimator

Before you contact your loan servicer to discuss repayment plans, you can use our Repayment Estimator to get an early look at which plans you may be eligible for and see estimates for how much you would pay monthly and overall.

FAQ's

The Current Top Seventeen Most Frequently Asked Questions.

1. Should I pay for help to fill out my FAFSASM?

No, you don't need to. If you apply using FAFSA on the Web SM at www.FAFSA.ed.gov, you get online instructions for each question, and you can chat live online with a customer service representative. Another source of free help is our online guide, Completing the FAFSA.

Whether you apply online or use the paper FAFSA, you can get free help by calling the Federal Student Aid ID (FSA ID) at the telephone number(s) listed below or by contacting the financial aid administrator at your college.

Federal Student Aid ID (FSA ID):
By e-mail at StudentAid@ed.gov (for general inquiries that do not include personally identifiable information)
By phone at 1-800-557-7394,
By TTY for the hearing impaired at 1-800-730-8913, and
By web chat. From fafsa.gov click “Help,” then “Contact Us” and then the LIVE HELP button to initiate a chat.

Various Web sites do offer help filing the FAFSA for a fee. These sites are not affiliated with, or endorsed by, the U.S. Department of Education. We urge you not to pay these sites for assistance that we provide for free.

2. What is FSAID?

The FSA ID as your electronic passport to federal student aid online.

Students, parents, and borrowers are required to use an FSA ID, made up of a username and password, to access certain U.S. Department of Education websites. Your FSA ID is used to confirm your identity when accessing your financial aid information and electronically signing your federal student aid documents.

You can create an FSA ID now by clicking here.

3. Where can I use my FSAID?

You can use your FSA ID immediately to complete and electronically sign your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®; www.fafsa.gov) [your parent can sign with his or her own FSA ID].

Once your name, Social Security number, and date of birth are verified with the Social Security Administration (SSA), you can then use your FSA ID to access these Federal Student Aid systems:

  • Free Application for Federal Student Aidat www.fafsa.ed.gov:
    - Pre-fill data in this year's FAFSA if you filed a FAFSA last year.
    - Make online corrections to an existing FAFSA.
    - View or print an online copy of your Student Aid Report (SAR).
  • The National Student Loan Data SystemSM Web site at www.nslds.ed.gov:
    -View a history of the federal student financial aid you have received.
    -Look up your loan servicer information.
  • The StudentLoans.gov Web site at www.studentloans.gov:
    -Complete Entrance Counseling.
    -Electronically sign a master promissory note (MPN).and payoff information.
    -Complete PLUS loan requests.
    -Complete Exit Counseling.
  • The My Federal Student Aid Web site at StudentAid.gov/log-in:
    -View a history of any federal student aid that you have received.
    -Look up your loan servicer information.

4. I forgot my FSAID. How can i retrieve?

You can enter your e-mail address, if you verified it, instead of your username when logging in to websites that use the FSA ID.

To retrieve your username:

  1. Go to Edit My FSA ID
  2. Click “Forgot My Username” underneath the “Username” field.
  3. Choose the option to receive a secure code via e-mail (open your e-mail in a different browser window or device) or to answer challenge questions. Follow the instructions on the screen.
  4. After successfully entering the secure code received by e-mail or by answering your challenge questions, the username will be displayed on screen.

5. How can I check the status of my FAFSASM application?

To check the status of your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), click Login on the FAFSA on the Web home page to log in; your FAFSA status can be found on the “My FAFSA” page, which displays immediately after you log in if you have already started or completed a FAFSA.

To check on the status of financial aid being disbursed to you or your account, check with the financial aid office at your college.

Note: If you submitted a paper FAFSA, you can check the status of your application after it has been processed (roughly 7-10 days from the date mailed).

6. Can I add a school code to my FAFSASM application?

You may either make the correction online with your FSA ID, over the phone (1.800-557-7394).

7. What is the deadline for the FAFSASM application?

Submit your application as early as possible, but no earlier than June 30, 2017. For the 2016-2017 school year, we must have your application no later than June 30, 2017. Your college must have your correct, complete information by your last day of enrollment in the 2016-2017 school year.

For the 2017-2018 school year, we must have your application no later than June 30, 2018. Your college must have your correct, complete information by your last day of enrollment in the 2017-2018 school year.

8. I haven't finished my taxes yet. What should I do?

If you are facing a deadline and want to get the application in as soon as possible, you may estimate your tax amounts for now. Once you have completed your tax forms, make the corrections to your file either on the Web or by mailing in your paper SAR.

9. Why do I have to provide my parents' information on the FAFSASM?

When you apply for federal student aid, your answers to the questions in Step 3 of the paper FAFSA or the Dependency Status section of the online FAFSA will determine whether you're considered dependent on your parents or independent. If you're considered dependent, your parents' income and assets as well as your own must be reported on the FAFSA. Students are classified as dependent or independent because federal student aid programs are based on the principle that students (and their parents or spouse, if applicable) are considered the primary source of support for postsecondary education.

10. How can I check the status of my student loans?

You should contact the holder of your loan. If you don't know who holds your loan, you can use our Web site (www.nslds.ed.gov) to find out about your federal student loans. The site displays information on loan and/or federal grant amounts, outstanding balances, loan statuses, and disbursements.

To use the NSLDS Student Access Web site, you will need to provide your Social Security Number, the first two letters of your last name, your date of birth, and your PIN.

11. I have questions about my financial aid award. Who should I contact?

Contact the financial aid office at your school. The financial aid administrator at a postsecondary institution combines various forms of aid into a package to help meet a student's need. Using available resources to give each student the best possible package of aid is one of the aid administrator's major responsibilities. Because funds are often limited, a financial aid package might fall short of the amount a student is eligible for. Also, the amount of federal student aid in a financial aid package is affected by other sources of aid received (scholarships, state aid, etc).

12. How can I get in touch with someone who can help me with a financial aid question?

If you wish to speak with a person regarding a financial aid question, please call one of the telephone numbers provided below:

Telephone: 1-800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3243)
TTY: 1-800-730-8913
Spanish speakers are available (se habla espaol)

If you are unable to dial the toll-free number from your area, an alternate number is 1 (334) 523-2691.

To find out more about the U.S. Department of Education's (ED) federal student aid programs, click here.

13. Where can I find out more information about Pell Grants?

Federal Pell Grants

A Federal Pell Grant, unlike a loan, does not have to be repaid. Pell Grants are generally awarded only to undergraduate students who have not earned a bachelor's or a professional degree. (In some cases, however, a student enrolled in a post- baccalaureate teacher certification program might receive a Pell Grant.) Click here to learn more about Pell Grants.

How much can I get?

Amounts can change yearly. For the 2019–20 award year (July 1, 2019, to June 30, 2020), the maximum award is $6,195. The amount you get, though, will depend on:
* your financial needs
* your cost of attendance,
* your status as a full-time or part-time student, and
* ​your plans to attend school for a full academic year or less.

If I am eligible, how will I get the Pell Grant Money?

Your school can apply Pell Grant funds to your school costs, pay you directly (usually by check), or combine these methods. The school must tell you in writing how much your award will be and how and when you'll be paid. Schools must disburse funds at least once per term (semester, trimester, or quarter). Schools that do not use semesters, trimesters, or quarters must disburse funds at least twice per academic year.

14. I am an older student. Am I eligible to receive financial assistance?

Age is not a factor in determining eligibility for the Federal Student Aid programs. Check out federal student aid eligibility criteria by clicking here.

15. What if I am unable to provide my parents information, their income information and signature, due to special circumstances?

Under Federal law your family is primarily responsible-to the extent they are able-for paying for your college expenses. To determine how much your family can afford to pay towards your college expenses, we must collect your financial information and if you are a dependent student, we must also collect your parents' financial information.

Under very limited circumstances, an otherwise dependent student may be able to submit the FAFSA without parental information due to special circumstances. Before you proceed to skip the parental section of your FAFSA, consider the following:

Examples of special circumstances where you may be able to submit your FAFSA without providing parental information include:

  • Your parents are incarcerated; or
  • You have left home due to an abusive family environment; or
  • You do not know where your parents are and are unable to contact them (and you have not been adopted).

Not all situations are considered a special circumstance. The following are situations that would not be considered a special circumstance:

  • Your parents do not want to provide their information on your FAFSA; or
  • Your parents refuse to contribute to your college expenses; or
  • Your parents do not claim you as a dependent on their income taxes; or
  • You do not live with your parents.

If you believe you have a special circumstance and are unable to provide parental information, you should complete information about you and your finances and skip any questions about your parents. You should sign your FAFSA with your PIN and leave your parent's PIN blank. It is important to note:

  1. We will allow you to submit your FAFSA without parental information, however your FAFSA will not be considered complete.
  2. Because your FAFSA is not considered complete, we will not calculate your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) which is the index used by colleges to determine how much student aid you are eligible to receive.
  3. If you are approaching any deadlines for your state, college, or scholarship aid, you may want to contact your financial aid administrator (FAA) before submitting your FAFSA without parental data.
  4. Once you submit your FAFSA without parental data, you must follow up with the FAA at the college you plan to attend, in order to complete your FAFSA and receive an EFC. Also note the following:

    - Under Federal law, only your FAA has the authority to decide whether or not you must provide parental information on your FAFSA.

    -You will have to provide documentation to verify your situation. Gather as much written evidence of your situation as you can. Written evidence may include court or law enforcement documents, letters from a clergy member, school counselor or social worker, and/or any other relevant data that explains your special circumstance.

    - After reviewing your circumstances carefully, your FAA will decide if you must provide parental information or if your circumstances allow you to proceed without providing parental data. Your FAAs decision is final and can not be appealed to Federal Student Aid.

Tools & Resources:

Wanting to apply for federal student aid? Looking for scholarships? Trying to decide on a career?

The sites below provide the information you are seeking to assist you in your education beyond high school.

Apply for Federal Student Aid

You must complete and submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSASM) to apply for federal student aid and most state and college aid. FAFSA on the WebSM is the quickest and easiest method of applying.

PDF FAFSASM

You have the option of applying for federal student aid by completing a PDF form of the FAFSA. The PDF FAFSA is available for you to print and fill out manually or is screen-fillable.

Completing the FAFSASM

If you're not sure how to answer a question on the FAFSA form and/or you're wondering, "Why do they ask that?," or saying, "My family situation is different, now what do I do?", Completing the FAFSA explores the purpose of FAFSA questions and discusses how information should be reported in some unusual cases.

Apply for a PIN

We recommend that students and parents request a personal identification number (PIN) before applying for aid. The PIN can be used to electronically sign your FAFSA application, dramatically decreasing the processing time. You can also use your PIN to make online corrections to your FAFSA, access your Student Aid Report, sign the master promissory note for a federal student loan and access your federal student aid records online including your student loan history information on National Student Loan Data SystemSM (NSLDSSM).

FAFSA4casterSM

If you want to begin exploring your financial aid options and get an early start on the financial aid process, FAFSA4casterSM is for you! By using FAFSA4caster, you and your family will receive an early estimate of eligibility for federal student aid. When youre ready to apply for aid, much of the information that you enter in the FAFSA4caster will populate your FAFSA on the Web application, making the experience of applying for federal student aid a lot easier.

FAFSA on the WebSM Worksheet

Over 90% of the FAFSA applications are submitted online. The FAFSA on the Web Worksheet is designed for those who prefer to write down information before applying online. The Worksheet includes a list of documents needed to complete the FAFSA and shows the FAFSA questions in the order as they appear online.

FAFSASM Demo Site

This Web site is a demonstration version of the FAFSA on the Web, Corrections on the Web, and Student Access. It offers all the features of the production versions, except that no data is processed. At the site you learn to complete a sample FAFSA, make corrections, check the status of the FAFSA and electronically sign the FAFSA.

StudentLoans.gov

The U.S. Department of Education’s StudentLoans.gov Web site provides information on managing your student loans, such as, – view your loan documents, sign Master Promissory Note, entrance counseling and complete PLUS request process.

Scholarship Search

A scholarship is money for college that you will not be expected to repay. Colleges, businesses and other organizations sponsor scholarships. Use this free scholarship search for finding scholarships that you may qualify for.

Career Information

CareerOneStop Web site (sponsered by the U.S. Department of Labor) features user-friendly occupation and industry information, salary data, career videos, education resources, career exploration assistance, and other resources, such as the new ReEmployment portal, that support talent development in today's fast paced global marketplace.

The Career Voyages Web site is the result of a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Labor and the U.S. Department of Education. It is designed to provide information on high growth, in-demand occupations along with the skills and education needed to attain those jobs.

Publications

The Publications section provides access to a wealth of free publications and application tools to assist you as you pursue education beyond high school. You will find guides, brochures and fact sheets such as College Preparation Checklist, Funding Education Beyond High School: The Guide to Federal Student Aid, Completing the FAFSA, Federal School Code List, Choosing a Career and Don't Get Scammed on Your Way to College.

Federal Student Aid Forms

The Federal Student Aid Forms section has information on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) filing options, deadlines for applying, a sample paper FAFSA, FAFSA on the Web Worksheet, and student loan deferment and forbearance forms.

National Student Loan Data SystemSM

The National Student Loan Data SystemSM (NSLDSSM) is the U.S. Department of Education's central database for student aid. NSLDS receives data from schools, guaranty agencies, the Direct Loan, Pell Grant, and other Department of Education programs. At NSLDS Student Access, aid recipients can view information on their loans and grants.

Repayment Plans and Calculators

The Direct Loan Programs provide you with a choice of repayment plans. How much you pay and how long you take to repay your loans will vary depending on the repayment plan you choose. The Repayment Plans and Calculators page provides information on the various repayment plans and calculators for estimating your repayment amount under each plan.

Audio and Video Programs About Federal Student Aid

What types of aid are available? How do you get a PIN? What's the difference between an Academic Competitiveness Grant and a National SMART Grant? Learn more about federal student aid by watching or listening to these informational programs.

The more education you get, the more likely it is you will always have a job. KnowHow2GO provides middle schoolers to adults extensive information on the value of continuing education after high school, how to prepare for college, the myths vs. realities about college and the availability of financial aid for college. In addition, the KnowHow2GO Web site provides resources for information on counseling, academics, and financial aid that is available within your state or territory.

Check out the College Access Web site Going2College.org. This Web site provides all the resources your state has on preparing for college, planning a career, finding and applying to college and what state aid is available to help pay for college.